Realtime 4WD System Description

Outline

The Real-time 4WD-Dual Pump System model has a hydraulic clutch, a cam unit, and a differential mechanism in the rear differential assembly. Under normal conditions, the vehicle is driven by the front wheels. However, depending on the driving force of the front wheels and the road conditions, the system instantly transmits appropriate driving force to the rear wheels without requiring the driver to switch between 2WD (front wheel drive) and 4WD (four wheel drive). The switching mechanism between 2WD and 4WD is integrated into the rear differential assembly to make the system light and compact.
In addition, the dual-pump system switches off the rear-wheel-drive force when braking in a forward gear. This allows the braking system to work properly on models equipped with an Anti-lock Brake System (ABS).

Construction

The rear differential assembly consists of the torque control differential case assembly and the rear differential carrier assembly. The torque control differential case assembly consists of the differential clutch assembly, the companion flange, and the oil pump body assembly. The rear differential carrier assembly consists of the differential mechanism. The differential drive and driven gears are hypoid gears.
The differential clutch assembly consists of the clutch guide, the clutch plate, the clutch disc, the clutch hub, the return spring, the pilot clutch, and the cam unit.
The oil pump body assembly consists of the front oil pump, the rear oil pump, the hydraulic control mechanism, and the clutch piston. The clutch piston has a disc spring that constantly provides the differential clutch assembly with a preset torque to prevent abnormal sound.
The clutch guide in the differential clutch assembly is connected to the propeller shaft via the companion flange, and it receives the driving force from the transfer assembly. The clutch guide rotates the clutch plate and the front oil pump in the oil pump body.
The clutch hub in the differential clutch assembly has clutch discs that are splined with the hypoid drive pinion gear. The hypoid drive gear drives the rear oil pump.
The front and rear oil pumps are trochoidal pumps. The rear oil pump capacity is 2.5 percent larger than the front oil pump to handle the rotation difference between the front and rear wheels caused by worn front tires and tight corner braking. The oil pumps are designed so the fluid intake works as a fluid discharge when the oil pumps rotate in reverse. Honda Dual Pump Fluid is used instead of differential fluid.

REAR DIFFERENTIAL ASSEMBLY 

Cam Unit Mechanism


Operation

The cam unit mechanism is placed between the clutch piston and main clutch (clutch disc and clutch plate), and have a structure that the balls sandwiched in between the two cam plates (apply cam and base cam).
If the difference in rotation occurs in the clutch guide (front wheels side) and clutch hub (rear wheels side), apply cam (set in clutch guide) and base cam (attached to clutch guide with pilot clutch between) will be expanded to the side by the balls.
This serve as the engine for the main clutch-engage, and the apply cam will pushes the clutch plate and clutch disc. As a result, the main clutch would be engaged and rotating torque of the clutch guide is transmitted to the clutch hub. The cam unit is one-way structure, so only operate in forward driving. And then, the main clutch is engaged as clutch piston is pushed by hydraulic pressure come up of oil pump.

 

 

Cam Unit Mechanism


Characteristic features

Constant speed
It is set for 2WD drive when the forward and reverse driving in constant speed (when front wheels don't have difference in rotation), and when brake is on for forward driving (during deceleration).

CONSTANT SPEED 

Forward start and Acceleration (when number of skidding is very few)
When number of skidding is very few, drive transmission to the rear wheels occurs within a fraction of a second by the cam unit operation. Time of wheel spin of the front wheels on the snow covered roads is shortened since engagement of the main clutch (clutch disc and clutch plate) by the cam unit operation starts before hydraulic pressure comes up from oil pump. Also, drive transmission to the rear wheels may occur by the cam unit operation when turning a streering wheel (cornering).

Forward start and Acceleration (when number of skidding is large)
When number of skidding is large, drive transmission to the rear wheels occurs by engaging the main clutch (clutch disc and clutch plate) as clutch piston is pushed by hydraulic pressure from front and rear oil pump in addition to the cam unit.

 

The characteristic of torque transmission of different rotation in front and rear wheels
The real time 4WD-DPS (Dual Pump System) realize characteristic of torque transmission that bring reduction of driving resistance and smooth cornering. Also by equipping cam unit mechanism in addition to conventional structure, cam torque area is added to the characteristics in torque transmission, and improved drivability on snow covered roads.



CONSTANT SPEED, FORWARD START AND ACCELERATION 

Oil Pump Hydraulic System


Operation

When there is a difference in rotation speed between the front wheels (clutch guide) and rear wheels (hypoid driven gear), at the first time, clutch is engaged by the cam unit, then hydraulic pressure from the front and rear oil pumps engages the differential clutch, and drive force from the transfer assembly is applied to the rear wheels.
The hydraulic pressure control mechanism in the oil pump body selects 4WD mode when the vehicle is started abruptly, or when accelerating in a forward or reverse gear (causing rotation difference between the front and rear wheels), or when braking in reverse gear (when decelerating). It switches to 2WD mode when the vehicle is driven at a constant speed in forward or reverse gear (when there is no rotation difference between the front and rear wheels), or when braking in a forward gear (when decelerating).
To protect the system, the differential clutch assembly is lubricated by hydraulic pressure generated by the oil pumps in both 4WD and 2WD modes. Also, the thermal switch relieves the hydraulic pressure on the clutch piston and cancels 4WD mode if the temperature of the differential fluid rises above normal.



HYDRAULIC CONTROL SYSTEM 

Forward Start and Acceleration (4WD)

During a forward start and forward acceleration, the dual pump system can engage four wheel drive.
If the front wheels spin faster than the rear wheels, the front oil pump spins faster than the rear oil pump. The front pump draws fluid through check valve B and discharges it. Some of the discharged fluid is drawn in the by the rear oil pump. The remaining fluid will pass through check valve E into the clutch piston. There, hydraulic pressure is regulated by two orifices.
The regulated hydraulic pressure at the clutch piston pushes the plates and discs of the clutch together to form a connection. The engaged clutch then passes driving force from the transfer assembly to the rear wheels, producing 4WD.

 

Forward Driving at Constant Speed (2WD)

When driving forward at a constant speed (cruising), the dual pump system functions in two wheel drive mode.
The rotation speed of the front and rear wheels are the same, so the speed of the front and rear pumps are also the same.
Fluid discharged by the front oil pump is drawn in by the rear oil pump and is circulated through the system. Because there is no pressure built up at the clutch piston, the clutch does not engage, and the vehicle remains in 2WD (front wheel drive).

 

Forward Deceleration (2WD)

During forward deceleration, the dual pump system functions in two wheel drive mode.
Because of braking characteristics, the speed of the rear wheels may exceed the speed of the front wheels during deceleration. If so, the rear oil pump spins faster than the front oil pump.
Fluid discharged by the rear oil pump is simply drawn in again by the rear pump and recirculated. Because there is no pressure built up at the clutch piston, the clutch piston does not engage, and the vehicle remains in 2WD (front wheel drive).

 

Reverse Start and Acceleration (4WD)

During reverse start and reverse acceleration, the dual pump system can engage four wheel drive.
If the front wheels spin faster than the rear wheels, the front oil pump spins faster than the rear oil pump. The front oil pump draws in fluid through check valve A and discharges it. (Note that in reverse, the direction of the pumps is the opposite of that during forward driving.)
Some of the fluid that is discharged by the front oil pump is drawn in by the rear oil pump. The remaining fluid passes through check valve F into the cylinder of the clutch piston, where it is regulated by two orifices.
The regulated hydraulic pressure at the clutch piston may force the plates and discs of the clutch together to form a connection. The engaged clutch passes driving force from the transfer assembly to the rear wheels, producing 4WD.

 

Reverse Driving at Constant Speed (2WD)

When driving in reverse at a constant speed, the dual pump system functions in two wheel drive mode.
The rotation speed of the front and rear wheels are the same, so the speed of the front and rear pumps are also the same.
Fluid discharged by the front oil pump is drawn in by the rear oil pump and is circulated through the system. But, because there is a difference in the capacity between the two pumps, fluid flows through check valve E, and then through orifices. This fluid lubricates and cools the clutch assembly and bearings.
In this condition, only a low pressure is built up at the clutch piston. Therefore the clutch does not engage, and the vehicle remains in 2WD (front wheel drive).

 

Reverse Deceleration (4WD)

During reverse deceleration, the dual pump system can engage four wheel drive.
When decelerating in reverse direction, the speed of the rear wheels may exceed the speed of the front wheels (due to engine braking). In this condition, the rear oil pump draws fluid through check valves B and C. Fluid discharged from the rear oil pump then flows through check valve E to the clutch piston. There, pressure is regulated by two orifices.
The regulated hydraulic pressure at the clutch piston may force the plates and discs of the clutch together to form a connection. The engaged clutch passes driving force from the transfer assembly to the rear wheels, producing 4WD.

 

Thermal Switch Operation (2WD)

During 4WD operation, pressure-regulated fluid is in contact with the clutch piston and the thermal switch.
If the temperature of the fluid in the differential goes too high, the thermal switch pushes open the relief valve R. This causes the pressure in the clutch piston to drop, and 4WD mode is disengaged.

 

Relief Valve Operation

When the fluid pressure goes higher than the relief valve spring force, check that valve R opens. Pressure applied at the clutch piston is held constant. This feature adds stability by preventing the rear wheel drive system from experiencing excessive torque.